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News Items (33)

Annapolis Police Department Media Release

 

On January 5, 2020 the Annapolis Police Department received a report of sex offenses that occurred in the unit block of Juliana Circle West. The victim was identified as a 13 year old female. This investigation widened to include reports of child pornographic images.

s3d955aae29fa4924b22339223a98aa69 small optimizedThe suspect was identified as Jose Argueta, 44, of Glen Burnie. He came into contact with the victim as the driver of a church transportation van. It was reported that on four occasions Argueta sexually assaulted the 13 year old victim and during some of these assaults pornographic photos of the victim were taken by Argueta.
 

Detectives obtained an arrest warrant for Jose Argueta charging him with nineteen counts relating to the assaults. On January 9, Argueta was located and arrested. He is being held at the Jennifer Road Detention Center without bond.

The Annapolis Police Department is urging anyone with information about these incidents or the suspect to contact Detective Pyles at 410-260-3439 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. You can also submit anonymous tips through Metro Crime Stoppers of Maryland.

 

Submitting Anonymous Tips to Metro Crime Stoppers of Maryland

Metro Crime Stoppers of Maryland is an organization separate from the Annapolis Police Department. When you phone in or submit your Annapolis crime tip online or through the P3 Tips smartphone app Metro Crime Stoppers receives your tip anonymously and only forwards your tip information to the Annapolis Police Department. No identifying information is ever forwarded to us. Metro Crime Stoppers uses a special coding system to protect your identity, they do not use Caller ID or record telephone conversations. If your tip leads to the arrest or indictment of a person for a felony you could qualify for up to a $2,000 cash reward from Metro Crime Stoppers. You can submit a tip by calling 1-866-7LOCKUP (1-866-756-2587), visiting www.metrocrimestoppers.org, or through the P3 Tips smartphone app. The app can be found in the Apple or Android app stores by searching for P3 Tips.

Dashawn Wiggan had broken his foster home’s curfew.

With a mixture of fear and awe, he arrived with his boyfriend at the Christopher Street piers. Loud, fast beats with crashing rhythms met them in front of the dark Hudson River, where young dancers had congregated.

From the Anne Arundel County Police Department's Criminal Investigation Division- Major Crimes Section

On Saturday, July 27, 2019 at approximately 9:28 a.m., the Anne Arundel County Police and Fire Departments responded to the 7900 block of Chesapeake Drive, Orchard Beach, Maryland for a nine month old male infant in medical distress. The infant was transported to the Baltimore Washington Medical Center for further medical treatment. Life saving measures were continued at the hospital until 10:19 a.m. where the infant, identified as Niyear Taylor of the 7900 block of Chesapeake Drive, was pronounced deceased.

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (WJZ) — For years, advocates have pushed for stricter safeguards against child abuse or neglect.

Failure by officials to report suspected abuse or neglect as required by law now carries jail time and fines.

The change comes in the wake of a notorious case of a former teachers aide in Prince George’s County, who in 2016 was indicted on 270 counts related to the sexual abuse of more than a dozen children at Judge Sylvania Woods Elementary School.

Deonte Carraway is now serving 75 years in prison for sexually exploiting children. Some students had reportedly gone to teachers about it, but nothing would be done.

“Two years ago, (then-county state’s attorney) Angela Alsobrooks testified on these hearings in Annapolis that when the Deonte Carraway case came up in Prince George’s County, she had no remedy to hold those professionals accountable,” said Adam Rosenburg with the Baltimore Child Abuse Center.

That changed in October. Maryland law now holds adults, including teachers, youth workers, healthcare personnel and others, responsible for filing written reports under penalty of law.

Failure to comply carries a penalty of up to three years in prison and a $10,000 fine.

“The child would say ‘This just happened to me,’ and the adult in authority wouldn’t do anything about it there,” Rosenburg said. “By not reporting the abuse, children continued to be abused and bad people continue to get away with it.”

Read More at WJZ-TV

Anne Arundel County State's Attorney Anne Colt Leitess announced today that a jury convicted James Robert IV, 38, of Severn of sex abuse of a minor, seven counts of rape and lesser included offenses. This appears to be the first case in the State of Maryland where a comfort dog accompanied a victim when testifying during a trial.


"Testifying in court can be extremely traumatizing for survivors of sexual assault especially for a child. In this case, the use of a comfort dog provided the survivor with a sense of safety as she recounted the horrific details about the abuse she suffered," said Anne Arundel County State's Attorney Anne Colt Leitess. "With professional counseling and continued family support, I hope that she will continue to heal. I am grateful that the defendant will be held accountable for his crimes and can no longer hurt her. I would like to thank Caring Canines for providing this valuable service to those who have been traumatized."


On November 15, 2018, the Anne Arundel County Police Department responded to the 1700 block of Carriage Court to conduct a well-being check after receiving a tip from a sexual assault tip line. The tip stated that the defendant, later identified as James Robert IV, had raped the survivor. On November 20, 2018, the Anne Arundel County Police Department and the Anne Arundel County Department of Social Services interviewed the survivor who revealed that the defendant raped her on four separate occasions and threatened to kill her. During one incident, she advised that he choked her and only stopped after she told him she was unable to breathe.


During the trial, the survivor testified with the aid of a comfort dog from Caring Canines. The dog and handler were trained and certified through PetPartners.org to provide interventions and emotional support for victims of trauma. In 2018, Anne Arundel County and Harford County Circuit Courts became part of a pilot program allowing the use of comfort animals in the courthouse. The program was launched with the support of Administrative Judge Laura Ripken who considers written requests made on behalf of children who appear in either civil or criminal proceedings.
Robert will be sentenced on January 29, 2020 by the Honorable Stacy W. McCormack.


Assistant State's Attorney Mary-Ann Burkhart prosecuted the case on behalf of the citizens of Anne Arundel County.

It was one of Canada's most promising social media apps. But Kik, once valued at $1 billion, is to be closed, in large part because of a Securities and Exchange Commission investigation into a cryptocurrency created by the app's owners.

960x0Though not mentioned in the closure announcement released late Monday by CEO Ted Livingstone, the anonymous messaging app faced consistent criticism it had become a crime haven. Harassment and child exploitation, for instance, were constant problems.

In one shocking case, a 13-year-old was murdered by the man with whom she was communicating over Kik. A Forbes investigation later found that grooming and sharing of child abuse material was rife across the app. And earlier this year, it emerged the FBI had taken control of a Kik user's account to run groups sharing such illegal imagery for over a year as investigators sought to ensnare pedophiles. 

But Livingtone didn't mention any of those problems. Instead, he said the company is refocusing on its cryptocurrency, Kin, launched back in 2017. In June the SEC charged Kin's creators over an initial coin offering (an ICO is a public sale of a cryptocurrency's tokens) that raised $100 million. (After another Forbes investigation, Kik promised to spend $10 million of that money on dealing with child abuse on the platform; with many other platforms, like Facebook and Twitter, also now investing hundreds of millions to deal with similar problems, the “anything goes” era now well and truly over.)

The SEC believes that Kin coins are, effectively, securities and should be regulated as such. That meant that the ICO should've been registered with the SEC, which it wasn't, according to the regulator. In a blog post, Livingstone cited problems with fighting the SEC on that issue as one of the core reasons for closing Kik.

READ THE FULL STORY ON FORBES

Days before Francois Brown was to stand trial for beating his girlfriend’s toddler to death, city prosecutors accused him of once fracturing the femur of a baby girl.

Assistant State’s Attorney Michele Lambert told a judge that Brown fractured a baby girl’s leg bone in November 2017, bringing to three the number of young children he allegedly hurt. Two of them died.

“The improbability of the defendant being innocently entangled in two child homicides and one serious non-fatality in the span of six years in facially inconceivable,” Lambert told the judge.

Paul Iantosca, the Denville school principal accused of trying to solicit sex from a 16-year-old former student, pleaded guilty on Wednesday to child abuse.

The 52-year-old principal of Valleyview Middle School was arrested in May after sending the student sexual messages on Snapchat, a social media platform, and arranging to meet him in a Denville parking lot.

 

DENTON — An Easton woman has been charged with child abuse after allegedly leaving an 18-month-old child along state Route 328 near Denton, state police said.

82E6A743 EE78 433E 8D84 9BBAA4E717C3Elizabeth Newnam, 29, of 29416 Petunia Drive, is charged with second-degree child abuse, neglect of a minor, reckless endangerment, second-degree assault, disorderly conduct and driving under the influence.

Read the full story at Times-Record (MD Eastern Shore)

Annapolis, MD -- Anne Arundel County State's Attorney Anne Colt Leitess announced today that Arthur Antonio Wiggins, 46, was found guilty of sex abuse of a minor by an Anne Arundel County Circuit Court jury.

Grants Awarded to Improve Child Abuse and Neglect Investigations 
Grants are Part of Federal Children’s Justice Act Funds

ANNAPOLIS, MD – The Governor’s Office of Crime Control and Prevention (GOCCP) today announced more than $250,000 in funding from the federal Children’s Justice Act (CJAC) grant program. Funding is awarded to organizations and law enforcement agencies to improve the  investigation, prosecution, and judicial handling of cases of child abuse and neglect, particularly child sexual abuse and exploitation.

“These grants have a tremendous impact in our communities,” said V. Glenn Fueston, Jr., GOCCP Executive Director. “This funding can assist with training or other administrative costs, allowing awardees to focus their funds in more strategic ways to protect children from abuse and neglect.”  

Grants were awarded to the following entities:

  • Anne Arundel County Police Department - $2,143
  • Baltimore Child Abuse Center, Inc. - $4,715
  • Baltimore County Department of Social Services - $3,135
  • Caroline County Department of Social Services - $3,520
  • Carroll County Sheriff's Office - $2,016
  • Center for Children, Inc. - $5,137
  • Community Advocates for Family & Youth - $31,668
  • Court Appointed Special Advocate of Allegany County, Inc. - $23,387
  • Court Appointed Special Advocate Program of Baltimore, Inc. - $17,820
  • Court Appointed Special Advocate of Caroline, Inc. - $7,098
  • Court Appointed Special Advocate of Harford County, Inc. - $7,098
  • Court Appointed Special Advocate of Montgomery County, Inc.- $10,000
  • Court Appointed Special Advocate of Prince George's County, Inc.- $17,778
  • Court Appointed Special Advocates of Washington County, Inc. - $1,980
  • Howard County Police Department - $6,728
  • Maryland CASA Association, Inc. - $18,425
  • Maryland Children's Alliance- $12,000
  • Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services - $71,696
  • Talbot County Department of Social Services - $3,842
  • The Tree House Child Advocacy Center of Montgomery County MD Inc. - $3,088
  • University of Maryland Baltimore - $23,223

This is the 14th year of the grant. Since the program began in 2004, more than $3 million has been awarded from the program.

Information about the federal CJAC program may be found https://www.acf.hhs.gov/cb/resource/childrens-justice-act&source=gmail&ust=1543340830476000&usg=AFQjCNECqtr3D8h0ZUZC4qev06Fu5exB2w Information about the state program may be found http://goccp.maryland.gov/grants/programs/cjac/%23documents&source=gmail&ust=1543340830476000&usg=AFQjCNFmHynf6NSQ41xT_Z89K11Qai0S0g.  

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catholic follow upThe explosive report about sexual abuse by Catholic priests unveiled by a Pennsylvania grand jury in August has set off an unprecedented wave of investigations over the last several months, with attorneys general in 14 states and the District of Columbia announcing probes and demanding documents from Catholic officials. Those efforts have been joined by a federal investigation out of Philadelphia that may become national in scope.

The swift and sweeping response by civil authorities contrasts sharply with the Vatican’s comparatively glacial pace. While some U.S. dioceses have published lists of priests they say have been credibly accused of sexual abuse and two cardinals have been ousted, the Vatican this month put on hold a vote by the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops on measures to hold bishops more accountable until after a global synod in early 2019. In the meantime, Rome has done little to address the crisis.

“The Catholic Church has proven that it cannot police itself,” said Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan (D), whose state is among those investigating. “And civil authorities can’t let the church hide child sexual abuse allegations as personnel matters. They’re crimes. We need a full accounting of the church.”

The new investigations are taking place in a very different climate than existed in 2002, when the Boston Globe exposed decades of abuse and coverups in that city. Many lay Catholics have lost faith in the church’s ability to right itself and are pushing for civil authorities to hold high-ranking church officials accountable. There’s also a greater willingness by law enforcement to do battle with a church that has become a far less formidable local presence. And the graphic grand jury report has spurred widespread public outrage.

However, hope for action won’t be satisfied quickly. Following an initial flurry of news conferences and calls to hotlines set up for the public to report abuse, there is likely to be an extended period of silence while prosecutors gather evidence.

Read The Full Story in the Washington Post

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